Track List

Entierro Del Primer Juguete (Burial of the First Toy)

Bajo Tierra (Under the Earth)

La Catedral De Los Puercos (The Pigs Monastery)

Los Mendigos Sangrados (The Holy Beggars)

La Muerte Es Un Nacimiento (Death Is Birth)

Curios Mexicano (Mexican Curios)

El Agua Viva (Living Water)

Vals Fantasma

El Alma Nace en la Sangre (The Soul Born in the Blood)

Topo Triste

Los Dioses De Azucar (The Sugar Gods)

Las Flores Nacen En El Barro (Flowers Born in the Mud)

El Infierno De Los Angeles Prostitutos (The Hell of the Prostituted Angels)

Marcha De Los Ojos En El Triangulos (March of the Eyes in the Triangles)

La Miel Del Dolor (The Pain of the Honey)

300 Conejos (300 Rabbits)

Conocimiento A Traves De La Musica (Knowledge Through Music)

La Primera Flor Despues Del Diluvio (The First Flower After the Flood)

Alejandro Jodorowsky - El Topo: Original Soundtrack (LP - Custom Silkscreened Jacket)
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Please Note: Pre-orders will ship on/by the week of the release date listed below. All items on order will hold until everything on order is in-stock and ready to ship. If you’d like to split your order to ship all available items immediately, please contact us. All product details including release date, packaging details and pricing are subject to change.
Release Date: 3/17/17
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Description

Special edition LP housed in silkscreened felt sleeve. Edition of 500.

Championed by everybody from John Lennon to Peter Gabriel—and decried by “Establishment” critics ranging from Vincent Canby to Gene Siskel—El Topo remains one of the controversial movies ever made. Director Alejandro Jodorowsky’s bizarre, blood-soaked blend of spaghetti Western, druggy surrealism, Christian allegory, Zen Buddhist themes and avant-garde sensibilities gave rise to the entire “Midnight Movie” counterculture phenomenon of the early ‘70s and forever changed the way adventurous audiences viewed film.

Or, for that matter, heard film; for no soundtrack, before or since, has embraced so many styles in its pursuit of spiritual and artistic goals. Atonal, Tibetan Buddhist thighbone trumpets clash with beautiful, even sentimental, chamber orchestra pieces alongside pan flute rhapsodies, brass bands and parlor jazz; that Jodorowsky himself composed the score—after, no doubt, intently studying the work of Morricone—is almost as impressive an artistic achievement as the film itself.